Making Your Own Cricket Bat

cricket bat

If the United States has football, the United Kingdom has cricket for a national game.

First played in 18th century, this game involves 2 teams with 11 players each. Just like baseball and softball, a bat and a ball are used – only, the game field has a 22-yard-long central section with 3 wooden stumps at both ends.

Interesting, right?

Thus, here are some tips in making your own cricket bat:

  • Use the right kind of wood. Cricket bats are usually made out of willow wood – specifically, from Cricket Bat Willow or Salix alba var. careulea – a kind of White Willow, which is best known for its toughness and shock-resistant characteristics. It’s also known to withstand the high-speed impact of cricket balls coming straight for the bat.
  • Use the right kind of saw. Cricket bats are also usually made with a circular saw, which ensures the cricket bat maker of a smooth and “almost” polished wood – or in this case, blade – cutting process. You can check out some of the best circular saws out there, as well as compare with other kinds of circular saws at http://sawingpros.com/best-circular-saw-reviews/.
  • It should have the right shape. To further polish the cricket bat’s blade, you will need a clear outline of it and a mechanical press to easily form it into the right shape: paddle-like with a triangular and thin slit at its end for the handle to fit in.
  • It should have a tight handle. You wouldn’t want to have your cricket bat flying off as you hit the ball in an official, would you? Always make sure that the handle and the blade is tightly attached by covering the triangular and thin slit and the handle’s point with both glue and rope.
  • It should be “fully” polished. And by this, it means that the overall cricket bat should look smooth and “fully” polished, which can be done by rubbing it with sandpaper and refining it with linseed oil.

Have fun making your own cricket bat, just like Hayden Sherwood!

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